Category Archives: Healthy Living

To Compost or not to Compost?

by, Liz Rutledge

Yimby Compost Bin

i Compost in the works!

I don’t know about you, but I cannot stand the smell of a stinky garbage bin.  All that rotting food gives off such a nasty stench.

One easy way we’ve lowered  our family’s carbon footprint is to start composting. And, as an added benefit, we no longer have the smelly trash issue.

I was shocked to learn that 1/3 of what goes to landfills is compostable.  Have you thought of reducing the amount of waste your household contributes to the landfill? Landfills emit methane as well as Carbon Dioxide and other gasses*.  Methane is a gas that is 20+ times more damaging to the Ozone Layer and traps up to 100 times more heat over a 5-year period than Carbon Dioxide (CO2).

Some cities, like our city of Denver,  have composting programs, which is a great option if you are not a gardener or if you rent an apartment or condo where composting is not allowed. You can reduce your trips to the dumpster and reduce your contribution to the landfill.

If you have your own property or rent in a property that has a community garden or landscaping, you can have your own compost!  Even if you live in an apartment, you can (usually) still have a worm farm.

Our family has been composting since 2000.   I can tell you that I do not miss having to go to the garden center and buy heavy, bagged-in-non-biodegradable-plastic bags.  Putting peelings and such in our kitchen collector bucket is a very natural action now and taking it out to the compost bin in the alley is just “something I do” as I head out for the day.

One of SustainableThree.com’s offerings is helping with compost start-up. After a brief interview, I can help you find a composter in your budget and a collection bucket for your kitchen. Then, it’s just a matter of collecting the right materials and giving it a weekly or bi-weekly stir. We set up the composter and get your composter cooking. If you want to learn the setup process, we can work together. Or, I can set it up and give quick instructions on how to maintain it. Once it’s set up, keeping it going is easy – just feed it and stir it regularly.

Sign up for a Composting Consultation and you’ll receive my “Composting Made Easy” guide FREE

Sign up here  for more information:

Building a Compost Bin

Building a Composter is Easy

*Methane and carbon dioxide make up 90 to 98% of landfill gas. The remaining 2 to 10% includes nitrogen, oxygen, ammonia, sulfides, hydrogen and various other gases. Landfill gases are produced when bacteria break down organic waste. (Source: https://www.health.ny.gov/environmental/outdoors/air/landfill_gas.htm)

I like to keep things simple (easy as 1-2-3), but if you want  more detailed information on composting, here are some resources:

http://eartheasy.com/grow_compost.html

https://www.theodysseyonline.com/panning-black-gold

earth911.com/home-garden/composting-how/

onegreenplanet.org/lifestyle/basic-composting-secrets/

planetnatural.com/composting-101/

Compost=Black Gold

Black Gold

Litter, Litter on the Ground…

Litter, Litter on the Ground…how long ’til you are found?

Litter

Paul Lewis…litter louts

Post Halloween candy wrappers are scattered on the ground about this time of year.  On the walk to my daughter’s school, I frequently see plastic sandwich baggies or granola bar wrappers.  (Funny, because I thought we ended littering in the 1980’s).  I usually pick them up, but sometimes it becomes an overwhelming task because there seems to be no end to it.  I have taught my children that they should pick up litter and put it in its proper place (the recycle bin if it’s recyclable, the garbage if it’s not).  But, once I (or they) pick up the litter, it is our responsibility to take care of it.

What does litter have to do with sustainable living?

Well, beyond the pure aesthetics, it can contaminate soil and water.  Especially if it seeps into the water table as well as clog storm drains and cause flooding.

On land, litter can smother plants, start fires and harm or kill animals. It also attracts rats and harmful bacteria.  On roadways, it can cause automobile accidents and injuries.  Like when people throw cans (or their fast-food restaurant waste) out their car window.  When litter (such as plastic straws and six-pack rings) end up in the ocean, it is devastating to marine life. Cigarette butts are terribly toxic.

Clean up efforts cost millions of dollars – so taxpayers are ultimately affected by litter in one form or another.  In a landmark study by Keep America Beautiful found that 85% of littering is attributed to individuals.

For our own part, we can be responsible about our own waste.  And…as you are walking around  – whether it be a parking lot, sidewalk, beach or mountain trail – pick up litter you see and dispose of it properly.  We can carry around biodegradable bags in our pockets or purses or backpacks and collect items in them until we can get it to a proper receptacle.  We’ll feel better for having done something good and the world will be a more beautiful place.

For more information on this topic, see these links:

http://education.seattlepi.com/littering-affect-environment-6802.html

http://www.sustainablebrands.com/news_and_views/behavior_change/case-study-how-we-changed-behavior-littering

Take Action!

Keep America Beautiful has heaps of research about littering, but also ways you can get involved:

https://www.kab.org/resources/end-littering

Save Water, Time and Money – Part 2

by,
Rob Rutledge

http://s3.amazonaws.com/digitaltrends-uploads-prod/2014/06/Screen-Shot-2014-06-04-at-3.15.24-PM.png

Smart Water Control – iPhone

Continuing the exploration of Smart Sprinkler controllers:  The goal is to save water, time and money but not have a dead lawn or landscaping.

There are many Smart Sprinkler controllers, and many definitions of what makes a sprinkler controller ‘smart’.  For instance, simply attaching a moisture sensor or rain sensor may qualify for some definitions of a Smart Sprinkler Controller.  However, I would like to think we can do better than simply attaching static sensors.  Therefore, I will limit my evaluation to those controllers that get weather data wirelessly and allow for control via mobile phone and computer, as well as allow for more intelligent watering by inputting landscaping and/or sprinkler information.  After all, I would like to think that better decision could be made rather than just automating the same binary decision of watering or not watering.  The final requirement is for the smart controller to adhere to the watering limitations of my water provider.  With these in mind, I return to the extensive list of Water Sense Smart Sprinkler Controllers.  Since most, if not all, of these controllers involve using the service associated with the controller (other than RainMachine which has a hybrid option), it seems as though there should be some consideration of the stability of the company.  After all, it would be unfortunate to make the investment in time and money to acquire and setup the controller, only to have it revert back to a normal controller or worse stop working all together due to the company providing the service going out of business.  Several of the companies are private, which limits the amount of due diligence that can be performed, so instead I will use longevity and multiple product offerings as a proxy for stability.  This is, of course, flawed.  But the best that can be done without extensive effort.  This only eliminates one that I thought looked intriguing, Skydrop.

 

Save Water, Money and Time – Part I

by,

Rob Rutledge

dreamstime_s_26939355

Part I

My water usage and associated bill is about to go up.  It happens every year.  In the next several months, my water bill will more than double, costing me an extra $40 or $50 each month.  I want to continue my Smart Home exploration of options, but not necessarily limit my options if I come across something even easier than smart home solutions.  For instance, the vast majority of my extra water usage is based on maintaining the plants and grass around my home.  I will focus on this aspect of water saving for now, but I also realize there might be some options to further reduce my water usage inside my home.  Although we have already used low flush toilets, low flow shower heads and better dishwasher usage.  Thankfully there is good information to leverage through programs like Water Sense, an EPA program that certifies products which save water, from 20% to 50%.  The technology portion of Water Sense narrows down the discussion to the areas that are of most interest to me, the sprinkler related savings opportunities.  Again, I need a criteria to go about selecting what options I want to explore.  I will use the same criteria as I am using to curtail electricity usage:

  • Easy to understand and install myself
  • Proven benefit for my environmental impact
  • Financial benefit of reduced monthly bills (at least during the summer)

Given those criteria, there are two options that seem most appropriate to explore.  Rotary Spray Heads (Nozzle), and Smart Spinkler Controllers.  The Rotary spay heads deliver water in a stream instead of a mist and therefore reduce lost water due to evaporation and wind blowing the water where it isn’t needed.  Smart Sprinkler Controllers use better information about your landscaping and external factors (like weather forecasts) to make better watering decisions.  Rotary Spray heads are valuable, but not nearly as interesting to explore here as Smart Sprinkler Controllers, so that is what I will focus on here.

 

Smart Home & Smart Investment? Part 3

Part III

by, Rob Rutledge

Ecobee Thermostat (ecobee.com)

Ecobee Thermostat (ecobee.com)

Nest Thermostat (nest.com)

Nest Thermostat (nest.com)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Furthering the journey towards a Smart Home, both the Nest and Ecobee thermostat optionshave very good reviews, and both have very cool technology behind them.  As an example I could adjust my home’s temperature while I am out of the house from a convenient app on my phone. The price of both is about the same (within $10).  It will come down to how I want to use them, and what will work best for my specific situation.  For instance, both have a motion sensing capability, and both will learn from how I adjust the temperature.  The motion sensing capability is particularly interesting to me as I only need my home to be cooled if I am currently using it, not while I am at the grocery store or out for a walk.  The challenge is that when I am at home, I often work from my office for hours at a time and that is not where my thermostat is located.  While I could schedule a walk by my thermostat every so often, that does not fulfill my desire to use technology to make my life easier rather than more complicated.  The EcoBee has a solution built in with remote sensors that I can place in different locations of my home.  That can provide the added benefit of helping keep the temperature consistent throughout the home.  I don’t have that issue with my home temperature, but I do want the motion detection of the remote sensor to eliminate having to walk by the thermostat or risk it thinking I am not home and trying to save some energy at the expense of my comfort.  Therefore, I will give the Ecobee a try and let you know how it goes.

Food as Fuel

by,

Liz Rutledge

dreamstime_s_37124190

You’re probably thinking this is a blog post about bio-diesel.  Well, it’s not…not this time, at least.  A good friend of mine who is busy and travels for work a lot recently challenged me to take on “Food as Fuel”.  The challenge is to create a meal plan of sorts such that said friend can eat 80% food as fuel and 20% food as a social activity.  Because my friend travels so much, I can only really assist with the home times.

I have always loved food.  My mother tells me that I ate green onions in my high chair.  I have always eaten my veggies without being told to and I have been vegetarian.  I took a nutrition class in college and was a weight loss counselor for a time.  I am passionate about food.

Not everyone loves eating their greens, which is why I think the green smoothie was invented…to mask the taste and texture of spinach, kale, collard greens and other green foods that some people don’t like in their most natural state.

I have started a quest to analyze daily recommended nutrition and come up with solutions that make life easier and maintaining our health more sustainable.  My quest, potentially much to my family’s chagrin, will include making easy “fast food” that fuels us and nourishes us.  I will include investigation in to the “Dirty Dozen” and the “Clean Fifteen” as well as when organic is important in general.

Solutions will include not only green smoothies, but also mason jar salads, mason jar pancake mix and burgers made up of so many foods, they may very well be all you need on your plate.

Suggestions are welcome, so feel free to comment!