Category Archives: Hard-to-Recycle

Cycle-Up Your CDs

CD Ornament

What to Do with Your Old CDs and DVDs

Most people these days use iTunes, Pandora, Spotify or the like to get their music.  But, what if you used to be a big CD collector?  Ever subscribe to that BMG Music Club?  If you’re like many people, most of your CDs are collecting dust somewhere in your home.  But, they don’t exactly bio-degrade, so what should you do?

Here is the SustainableThree.com guide to finding uses for your old CDs and DVDs:

1.  If they are playable, consider selling them and get paid! If you have the original case and insert, they are worth cash!  You can sell them at retailers like:

Stores like Twist and Shout will buy your CDs, DVDs and Games

Deluttr has a web site and an app. Using the app, you can scan the bar code on your CD case and easily enter your CDs into their system for payment.  You get about $0.40 per CD, but if you have a large enough quantity, you could get paid a decent amount for decluttering!

Game Stop will accept old video games

You could try to sell them on eBay or Craigslist or NextDoor and get ca$h.

2.  If your CDs or DVDs have passed their playing lifespan (too scratched or smudged to play), there are literally endless ways to re-use them:

  • Even if you don’t think you are crafty or creative, there are limitless creative possibilities on the web. Check out some of these links for ideas:

CD UpCycling

Google Images for CD Recycling

Pinterest for CD Recycling

Tumblr for CD Recycling

  • Personally, I use the CDs as labels for my crops in my garden. This has two benefits.  It creates an interesting way to label plants AND it scares birds away so you can enjoy more of your bounty!

Write the name of the plant you are growing with a permanent marker on the back side (the shiny one) of the CD

Attach the CD to a stick using a screw or glue or zip strip or twist tie.

Put the stick in the ground in the row where your plant is growing.

  • Places like R.A.F.T. (Resource Area for Teachers) will use your old CDs in craft projects for teachers, schools and participants in their programs. You can donate all sorts of items to them and even get a donation receipt.

3.  The last resort is recycling. Because CD plastic is a #7 type, it is not usually accepted in your local curbside recycling program.  Here are some other options:

Earth911.com has a recycling locator for all sorts of items as well as great advice on what to do with CDs (& their cases)

You can also try CD Recycling Center of America

Or try Recycle Now

Leave Your Leaves

Leaf Recycling Made Easy

Leaves are falling like crazy where we are right now.  It’s Autumn…when the trees have absorbed all the nutrients they need and take that inside to prepare for winter.  When the leaves’ job is finished, they naturally fall to the ground.

Don’t burn those leaves!  Burning leaves contributed to air pollution.  Instead, rake them up and put them in bags in your garage or the back of your yard or garden.  When you start your compost pile in the spring, you can use those leaves to get it started and continue to “feed” your compost throughout the winter and into next summer.

Fallen leaves carry 50-80% of the nutrients a tree extracts from the soil and air.  These nutrients include carbon, potassium and phosphorous.

Mulching your leaves and spreading them over your garden limits weed growth and adds organic matter and protects the soil.  It’s like a blanket for your garden to keep it warm through the winter!

Another option is to using city-wide leaf recycling or composting programs.

One example is Denver, CO’s Leaf Drop Program:

https://www.denvergov.org/content/denvergov/en/trash-and-recycling/composting/seasonal-programs.html

Try this link as a launching point and keep those leaves out of the landfill:

https://www.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl#q=where+to+recycle+leaves

Here is another read about leaf recycling:

4 water-related tips as you ‘fall back’ for winter

BONUS!

Don’t know what to do with your Halloween pumpkins?

You can cut them up and add them to your compost.

You can peel them, cut them up and freeze them for later. Or, roast them and puree them for soups or pies.